Link to What's New This Week UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures: Week of October 3, 2004

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UWP Commentary from Lectures -Week of October 3, 2004

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: October 9, 2004

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:
Week of October 3, 2004

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

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Subject of comment in green.
susan's commentaries in bright blue.

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 363: Corrections

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 365 : Race, Crime & Law

    Carley Huber wrote on Wednesday, October 6th:
    On Bill Cosby

    in discussing Bill Cosby at the end of class W.I. Thomas's quote came to mind "if men define situations as real, they are real in their consquences" yes many black people have been oppressed and their are hardships, however there are also opportunities. i feel as though people define situations as real but then when it comes to the consequences some (not all) will look to place blame every else but on themselves....just my opinion though.

    carley -- yes, it's a matter of perception. i wonder if someone can find the "transcript" of bill cosby's speech, so that we can all read it. i remember reading a newspaper article on it.

    Mona Mlejnek wrote on Wednesday, October 6th:
    On Bill Cosby

    this class has made me think deeply on the issue of race. i enjoyed todays discussion and was extremely interested in hearing some of the other students views and opinions on Bill Cosby's speech. I think it was Shayla who pointed out that the people who were offended by Bill Cosby's speech were the ones who the speech was aimed at. My opinion is that minorites have every right to be angry, bitter and resentful in respect to what they and their ancestors had to endure and continue to endure to this day. However, as Fellman points out anger and bitternes is self defeating. Everybody has a cross to bear and the people who can rise above the road blocks are the people who succeed and prosper. I have the utmost respect and admiration for people who take the negative things that have happened in their lives and are able to rise above it.

    mona -- i'm glad you're thinking about the issues discussed in this class. that's my goal to get students to think. if fellman and kennedy were sitting in today's class, what might they have said?



    Paul Kehrli wrote on Wednesday, October 6th:
    On Fellman and other things

    With all due respect, I know I've painted myself as a conservative, but I am not a close minded warmongerer (sp?). I was not trying to be cynical in class, I just believe that there is a LOT of talk about theories, but no practical or forseable application. (it sounds cynical but it really isn't intended to be, I will debate this as much as is needed) I am open to others views, even when they are starkley contrast to mine. I believe saying that I should dig a hole and bury myself is uncalled for.

    paul -- first of all, i'm wondering if you've read fellman from cover to cover because he does provide some practical applications. i am glad that you're open to the viewpoints of others. Secondly, I did not say that "you" should dig a hole and bury yourself. I was addressing pessimist and cynics. if you are neither, then certainly, the focus was not on you. what i am concerned about is "considering alternatives" by looking outside the box. be creative. do you have a better way? there are practical applications as outlined in fellman. what do you think of his suggestions? we can agree to disagree. but remain open-minded enough to listen to the Other. beware of "circles of certainty" and "privileging subjectivity." my purpose is to get you to think and to test your stance against other materials that you might not be exposed to elsewhere. this class is NOT about "agreeing" with the professor. This class is about the aesthetics of answerability. by the way, i did not "label" or "paint" you in the way you mentioned. the classroom is a "safe" place for learning. your original point about theory into practice is well taken. that's why we spend so much time talking about the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice." i'm glad to hear that you are open to other viewpoints. i appreciate the dialogue.

    Katie MacCready wrote on Thursday, October 7th:
    On cooperation

    In reponse to listening in good faith. Like I had metioned in class before about we as humans have strong emotions that get the better of us. Many of us are strong in our opinions and should voice how we feel about issues discussed in class. Yet control ourselves so that our emotions don't take control. By maybe tapping someone next to you and say," hey lets listen to everyone in class has to say" (uses the one of the 5 C's Cooperation), we can help to regulate the listening in good faith class policy.

    katie -- yes, that's a good reminder that one of our 5Cs is cooperation!



    Katie MacCready wrote on Friday, October 8th:
    On "The Spirit of Crazy Horse"

    In response to the film, "Spirit of Crazy Horse," there was point in the movie were they discussed race. It related to a previous class decision about what the defintion of race is. Two full blood Indians in the film were talking about mix-blood White and Indian blood. They said that one day the mix say they are white another they are Indian.

    katie -- yes, even within groups, distinctions are made. is race a social construct?

    Jeni Bradley wrote on Friday, October 8th:
    On "The Spirit of Crazy Horse"

    When watching this movie it reminded me of the war going on right now. I think it is sad that American Indians had their land taken away from them. European settles came in and took their land and made treaties almost destroying the Souix culture. I think that when the US now goes and tries to fix things in other cultures that its wrong. What is right for the US isnt right for everyone. I believe that somethings are just better left the way they are. People have a right to live their lives the way they want to.

    jeni -- and, they were here first. this is their land. try to relate all this back to the readings. but it does make one wonder about foreign policies vs. domestic issues, doesn't it?

    Mona Mlejnek wrote on Friday, October 8th:
    On "The Spirit of Crazy Horse"

    I just wanted to say that I enjoyed the film we watched today in class. It's interesting how usually when you think of racial discrimination your mind automatically goes to discrimination against blacks or hispanics or other minority groups that you hear about more often in the media. Today's film showed me how much discrimination continues to this day against Native Americans. The fact that you don't hear about it as much as other groups is sad.

    mona -- yes! that was one of the reasons why i showed this documentary. race and ethnic relations is not jus a "black-white" issue.

    On Friday, October 8th, April Puryear wrote:
    On "The Spirit of Crazy Horse"

    The film and the Kennedy book both mentioned the involvement of the FBI. The FBI seems to be present when ever there is a group of so called militants such as the Black Panther Party and the AIM, whom are trying to fight for the betterment of their people. It was very interesting to hear one of the "Goons" mention that was given ammunition to take care of those who did not conform to the rules. The FBI succeed in dividing the Sioux Indians and weakening them.

    april -- good point! makes you wonder what role does the FBI have when it comes to "race, crime, and the law"?

    Nick Contreras wrote on Friday, October 8th:
    On "The Spirit of Crazy Horse"

    I think, despite of the stress that's been put on the FBI in the past few years due to 9/11, that the FBI is kind of like the "big brother" to local police. When the local police can't handle a crime, in come the Fibs. I don't think so much, that the FBI meant to divide the Sioux and weaken them (unless i missed that part saying they tried to), but I think they did what was necessary at the time. Isn't that a good idea? The goon squads were fellow indians playing "police" roles. By the FBI coming and giving them guns and their "authority" to eliminate one who didn't conform to the rules, the feds were able to "distance" themselves from the happenings, while still playing a major role in the outcome. The US gov't today could've learned alot from that... playing a big role w/out losing thousands of its citizens. sorry this was like, 25000 words

    nick -- might want to do a creative measure on AIM's perspective on the FBI and/or the FBI's story on their dealings with the American Indian. interested?



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