Link to What's New This Week UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures: Week of October 24, 2004

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



UWP Commentary from Lectures -Week of October 24, 2004

Mirror Sites:
CSUDH - Habermas - UWP - Archives
Practice Module on This File

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: October 27a, 2004

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:
Week of October 24, 2004

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

* * * * *
Comments grouped by course.
Subject of comment in green.
susan's commentaries in bright blue.

Template:

  • Student Name:


  • All UWP Classes

    xxx wrote on xxxday, October xxth:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    On October xxth, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx --- xxx

    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx



    From CRMJ/SOCA 363: Corrections

    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    On xxxday, October xxth, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx



    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    On xxxday, October xx, 2004, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx



    From CRMJ/SOCA 365 : Race, Crime & Law

    Tasha Coleman wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    Can it happen again? I don't feel that it could happen as it did in the past but I do feel that it is happening. There are alot of people in prison for murder for many years and some on death row just because they were involved in political groups. We watched a documentary last semester in corrections and it showed many people involved in political groups in the 60s and 70s who were sent to prison for crimes that there was evidence that they even did it. I remember a woman who was in a group and sent to prison and now her son was being raised by other members of the group (I think) and there was also an Indian man whom they had no evidence on and still yet he is in prison. I know alot of people are talking about Mumia Abu-Jamal last semester. Reading that case and the evidence that they had and the what went on even about the different guns. I just wonder what's going on with our system here? They may not be just a specific race that is being locked up but they are groups of people only practicing their constitutional rights and being punished for it. Sorry so long.

    tasha -- yes, this is rather long. at any rate, i'm not sure if your answer to the question is "yes" or "no."

    Carley Huber wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    I just wanted to comment on the video, moreso on the comment Mona made in class about some denial going on; which I don't completely disagree with. I believe the people interviewed showed a great amount of dignity, and perhaps some of it is denial, but attempting to put myself in that position I think I would be living on pure survival mode. While I do believe it is important to talk about those horrible events, I'm not sure how I would go about doing so. An event like that would cause me to lose all my faith in not only the country and government but in human kind in general. Just wanted to share since the discussion was short today.

    carley -- thanks for sharing. we will have more time in class on friday to discuss this documentary.

    Samantha Collier wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    All I would take in case of a evacuation in the U.S. would be my king james bible, a paper and pad to write down the disrutbing situtions that I will be witnesing in the center. This evacuation would put me in a very unequal unjustice state of mind with my government because, I would contiune to worry why I'am in this camp and day dream about my family and there saftey.

    samantha -- be sure to mention this in class on friday.

    Andrea Jacob wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    One part in the video that we watched today that was surprising to me was how the people involved in the internment camps found things positive about their experience. They kept their patience and tolerance even though they lost everything. I think if I was in their position I would have been very bitter at the United States and I would have had a very hard time staying loyal. It does surprise me how long it took for an apology and how long it took the government to realize how wrong the internment camps were. I don^t think any amount of money the government compensated to the people afterwards could repay what the Japanese Americans had to endure while and after the internment camps.

    andrea -- there was another concept, "shikataganai" which translates to "it can't be helped". this goes along with "gaman" (mentioned in the documentary). together, these concepts help to explain how and why the japanese-americans responded to the evacuation and internment.

    Mona Mlejnek wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    I thought the film today was both intersting and sad. Interesting because throughout the film I kept thinking how if 9/11 had never happened we would probably all think there was no way that could happen again. I'm willing to bet though that alot of us were seeing the similarities between WWII and our present day war. I think it's totally feasible that individuals of middle eastern descent could possible face the same treatment if our country comes under attack again such as what happened on 9/11. Even after seeing the film though and definitely feeling for the Japanese people you could somewhat see what led our government to feel that was the only way. Not that I'm defending what our government did but you could see both sides of the coin.

    mona -- immediately after 9/11, the japanese american communities across this country saw parallels and wondered "it's happening again!"

    Jeni Bradley wrote on Wednesday, October 27th:
    On the documentary, "Without Due Process"

    Without Due Process reminded me of the concentration camp that I visited in Germany. The pictures of the barricks and the role call, how over crowded it was there. These people were forced to live there by the government becasue of their ethnicity. At the end of the movie they asked if this will ever happen again....I think it already has just in a different way.

    jeni -- how so? how different?

    On xxxday, October xxth, xxx wrote:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx

    xxx wrote on xxxday, October xxth:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx



    xxx wrote on xxxday, October xxth:
    On xxx

    xxx

    xxx -- xxx